Goal #1: Every student is on track to graduate as measured by student growth and achievement at key milestones.

 

We chose to focus on meaningful, research-based measures that our schools are already using to evaluate student achievement. Each Strategic Framework milestone measure corresponds to the achievement goals outlined in School Improvement Plans (SIPs).

What is MAP?

Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) are computer adaptive assessments designed to measure students’ academic achievement in reading, mathematics, and language. MAP adapts to student levels responses as they take the test. This means that if a student answers a question correctly, MAP presents a more challenging item; if he or she answers it incorrectly, MAP offers a simpler item. The final score is then an estimate of the student’s achievement level.

A key advantage of MAP is that it allows schools to assess not just a student’s proficiency, but also growth during the year. By tracking both proficiency and growth, we can better understand how our students are improving over time.

Goal 2: Every student has access to a challenging and well-rounded education as measured by programmatic access and participation data.

For the first time ever, the district compiled data on student access and participation in fine arts, world language and advanced coursework. Data is disaggregated by grade and by student groups. This baseline data will now be tracked, compiled and publicly reported on every year.

Secondary schools will also use this data to set goals for access and participation as part of their School Improvement Plans. Their results are publicly reported each year.

How are we measuring access and participation?

  • Participation in advanced courses, including include Advanced Placement, Honors, Advanced, Dual Transcripted, Youth Options, and youth apprenticeships
  • For grades 9-12, report on percentage of students who complete the advance coursework profile (earned four advanced course credits with a C or better by the end of Grade 12)
  • Participation in fine arts (art, music, theater, dance) and world languages
  • For grades K-5, report on percentage of students who participated in at least one fine arts course
  • For grades 6-8, report on percentage of students who participated in at least one fine arts course and at least one world language course (grades 7-8)
  • For grades 9-12, report on percentage of students who completed the fine arts and world languages profile (earned at least two world language and one fine arts credit with a C or better by the end of Grade 12)

Why did we choose these measurements?

  • Believe all coursework should be rigorous and prepare students for college readiness
  • Found that completion of the advanced coursework profile highly predictive of on-time high school completion and postsecondary enrollment
  • Grounded in the idea that every student, no matter their abilities and interests, is capable of accessing advanced coursework in some way every year
  • Annual participation rates are highly intuitive and commonly-used metrics
  • Completion of fine arts and world languages profile highly predictive of on-time high school completion and postsecondary enrollment

Goal 3: Every student, family and employee experiences a customer service oriented school system as measured by school climate survey data.

In the spring of 2015, the district surveyed students, families and staff about school climate. Each group was asked about relationships, teaching and learning, safety, institutional environment, school improvement, and family engagement.

Just like in goal #2, this baseline data will now be tracked, compiled and publicly reported on every year and schools will also use this data to set goals for access and participation as part of their School Improvement Plan.

What did we learn through the climate survey?

  • Teaching and learning was rated the highest by students and staff. Families rated relationships the highest
  • School Improvement and Institutional Environment were rated the lowest.
  • In the category of safety, families, students and staff averaged four out of five in a specific question rating feeling safe at their school.
  • Bullying emerged as a theme, signaling the need for continued work on positive behavior supports and bullying prevention.